Enve RSR Handlebar Long-Term Review

bar

Photo Courtesy of Annoyed Cyclist Photography School

It’s carbon. So it’s light and strong. I’ve been riding these bars for 2 years and they are like new. Realistically, I’ll never break them since they were probably designed for people who get more than 1 foot of air.

They are 740mm wide which is perfect. Unless you like narrower bars. Or wider bars. I just don’t want to bash trees. Because the trees always win.

It has sweep and rise (I’m sure the Enve website has some numbers) and magically my hands land right on the grips. I’m guessing your hands will find the bars, too.

bar-detail

The graphics – white on black

The graphics are understated. When I bought these bars that was cool. Now I’m not so sure – seems like Neon is big right now.

 

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Ibis 928 Wheelset Follow-up Review 

Ibis 928 logo and stem

Just a quick update on my Ibis 928 wheelset since the review I posted back in January.

Basically the wheels are as good as I described them back then. Stiff and light and they definitely liven up my hardtail.

I’ve had about 250 miles of trail and road use on them (about 75% on trails) and they are as true and smooth rolling as the day I first put them on. My buddy I bought them from figures he had about 250 miles on them before me so they only have 500 miles so far and I wouldn’t expect to see any issues at this point anyway. My tubeless setup has worked fine – I have to air them up about every week but I’m an electronic-tire-pressure-gauge, get-it-within-1-psi-reading kind of tire geek. I typically run 23 psi front and 24 psi rear (I’m 170 lbs) and I find I’ll lose a couple of psi per week which is similar to my previous setup on Stan’s rims. The hubs are still smooth and aren’t showing any play.

The only issue is a relatively minor one. The presta stems leak very slightly with the valve open. It seals fine after I screw in the valve. I don’t notice this on the stems that are on my Shimano and Stan’s wheels so it’s a bit annoying but just a niggle really. I’ll replace the valve cores at some point to see if that fixes it. And props to Ibis for supplying valve stems with removable cores – it costs them a bit more but it allows you to add sealant through the stem rather than popping a few inches of the bead of the tire from the rim to pour sealant in.

So in summary, it’s been a good upgrade. I have recently seen that some sites are selling the 928 wheelsets for $999 which is really a bargain in the world of carbon wheels. The timing of this discount suggests Ibis is getting ready to release a new rim and the shops are clearing out inventory but that’s just a guess on my part.

If you have $1000 burning a whole in your pocket this is probably the best upgrade you can make for that kind of money.

Ibis 928 Wheelset Review

IBIS_928_L3Qtr_Pair
Picture from: http://www.ibiscycles.com/wheels/

I was lucky enough to pick up a ‘gently used’ Ibis 928 carbon wheelset a few weeks ago from a friend upgrading to the 941 with the wider rim. So I thought it was time for a review.
I’ve been a 29er rider for over 7 years now and, like others, realized that wheel quality has a much bigger impact on 29″ bikes than the 26″ bike I came from. With more rotating weight there is a trade-off between stiffness and weight that is critical to 29er riding bliss. I’ve literally gone from ‘hate it’ to ‘love it’ on a 29er because of rim choice.

Early 29ers had wheels that were just too heavy. Fortunately, Stan’s came out with good tubeless-capable aluminum rims that got the right balance between weight and stiffness. The 355 rim and, with even better lateral stiffness, the Arch rim were key to my early 29er enjoyment.

Like a lot of riders I didn’t really appreciate what ‘stiffness’ meant until I was able to compare different products. My first significant experience with this was trading off between a high-end Aluminum full suspension bike and a Carbon frame bike. The carbon frame bike simply went where I pointed it. The lack or lateral flex meant that front and rear wheels tracked more in a line and I only steered with the front wheel and not the frame.

Sold on Carbon for frames, I jumped when I had the chance to buy the Ibis wheelset for $650 where it would be $1300 new. When you’re paying more for wheels than most people pay for a bike you really don’t want them to disappoint and they didn’t. In fact they were actually better than I imagined.

If your looking for just weight savings the wheels are not all that impressive. I went from the stock Stan’s Arch wheelset to the stock Ibis wheelset and knocked just 170 grams off the bike weight which amounted to an equal front/rear split. Basically the weight reduction for each wheel amounted to an 85 gram savings at the rim exactly as the Stan’s and Ibis specs indicated. Of course rotating weight savings are the holy grail of weight reduction so saving weight at the rim is a big deal.

Where I was even more excited was the ride performance. My first ride was a race-paced 30 mile loop at Fort Ord where most of the trails are fast and flowy with the occasional deeply rutted section – perfect terrain for my Flash29 hardtail. Just a few yards into the ride the bike felt lively and responsive and I felt great pushing it hard and leaving my buddy behind on the first moderate climb. I knew my speed at this point was more about my excitement with the new wheels and I backed off a bit so I could do the full ride. We hit the first twisty descents and I could feel the bike holding it’s line through the turns and when I hit my first deep ruts in the turns I noticed that I didn’t have to fight the front wheel as much to keep things pointed the right way. All-in-all the wheels made me more confident at speed and I was stoked I could actually feel the improvement.

I hope to try the wider 41mm rims sometime soon to see if the promised extra traction is as advertised. I expect that will be the case since Ibis delivered on the promises of the 928’s