Osprey Raptor 14 Hydration Pack Review

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Osprey Raptor 14

My go-to Ergon riding pack for 10 years was getting old. Broken zipper pulls and a few other issues so I started looking around for a replacement. Osprey packs are ubiquitous and I have a great winter backcountry pack from Osprey that has felt right on me since the first day I put it on. So, I checked out the Osprey packs first. Osprey really seems to sweat the details and you get the feeling that their designers are passionate riders who care about how other riders use their packs.

I’m one of those guys who seems to be the ‘rescue’ rider in the group. Not because I have any training or skills but just because I don’t leave anyone behind. I’ve fixed chains and flats for strangers. I’ve bailed out bonking noobs with food. On any but the shortest ride I have 2 tubes and a first aid kit. I wanted a pack big enough for extras and also capable of holding the removable chinguard from my Bell helmet. The Raptor 14 is big enough for all this, plus it compresses down for smaller loads.

Things I like:

  • Zippered pockets on the belt that are ideal for Clif bars and other snacks.
  • Integrated tool roll on the bottom gives easy access to your tools and holds them tight so they aren’t clanking around on a ride.
  • Magnetic attachment for the hydration tube to secure it to your pack. This works great every time and keeps the tube from dangling.
  • Small outer zippered pocket that is ideal for wallet and phone. ¬†And has a clip for keys. Even the little clip has a protrusion on it making it easier to open.
  • Hydration bladder closure. I thought this would be more clumsy than the Camelbak screw-cap closure but the sliding feature is super-repeatable and easy to use. No more leaks like I would get about 1 out of 10 times with the Camelbak. Plus, it’s easier to get excess air out of the bladder before sealing than with the screw cap Camelbak uses.
  • Helmet attachment gizmo that can be used to secure my chinguard.

When I talk about the details one small but impressive one is the clip that secures the zipper for the tool roll. This one ensures that the zipper can’t come open while riding which could leave your tools spread out over your favorite trail.

I’ve just left a month of riding Moab behind with 20 rides while I was there. In that time, I haven’t encountered a single negative to the pack. I’ll do a follow-up review in 6 months or so. If you have an Osprey let me know what you think.

Helmet attachment

Helmet clip is on an adjustable elastic cord

 

Room for chinguard

Easy to attach the chinguard to the outside of the pack

 

Helmet clip and chinguard

Using the helmet clip to secure the chinguard

 

Sunglass pocket

Lined sunglass pocket

 

Magnet

Magnetic clip secures the tube

 

Tool roll

The tool roll holds everything you need and rolls up into the bottom of the pack

 

Zipper clip

Tool roll zipper has this little clip to ensure it doesn’t open during your ride

Pedal Assist – Just Another Marketing Term

Interesting to see this sign at a trailhead in Moab the other day. The BLM had to post both ‘No e-bikes’ and ‘No pedal assist’ since the bike industry has pushed ‘pedal assist’ as the preferred deceptive marketing term. I hadn’t made the connection until I saw this, but ‘pedal assist’ doesn’t sound like you have a motor – it just sounds like magic that helps you pedal. 

With the lack of technical fluency of most of the population, I can’t blame the rider for not understanding that their pedal assist bike has a motor. Glad to see the BLM is holding the line on keeping motors off these trails. There are plenty of trails around Moab where motors are allowed – so I hope the BLM and other agencies continue to hold the line on this. 

Turn off the music


There are 2 types of riders when it comes to the subject of listening to music while riding; those who do and those who don’t. Pretty basic. 

But in the category of music listeners there are a number of variants. Those who are reasonably responsible who use just one earbud so they can hear other trail users, those who don’t give a shit about other users and use 2 earbuds ensuring that they are a danger to other users, and the totally self-centered who play their music through a Bluetooth speaker that basically says ‘I don’t care about your outdoor experience, I’m going to impose my crappy music on you’. 

Both of these last 2 suck, but for different reasons. With the 2-earbud rider at least they only piss me off when they do something stupid like turn in front of me as I’m passing them because they couldn’t here me call ‘On your left’. Fortunately, this has only happened a few times and hasn’t been disastrous yet because I expect it to happen when the rider doesn’t acknowledge me. 

The Bluetooth rider is more clueless. He (and it has been a ‘he’ 100% of the time) thinks everyone wants to hear his music. Or maybe – ‘chicks dig it’. All I can promise is that for every 100 trail users he encounters, 100 won’t like his music. Either they don’t want to hear music (or phone calls, or motors, or any of the things they are escaping from) when they are on the trail. Or they just think, ‘your music sucks’. I can’t choose NOT to hear your music – you can choose to turn it off. 

So – just turn it off – don’t be a wanker.