Bend Trail Work

2018-04-07 11.41.16

I’ve landed in Bend in the last month and I think we’re going to stay for a while. Being on the move for the last 13 months has been fun and rewarding but it’s time to stay somewhere for a bit longer and Bend feels like the right spot.

I’m fortunate to find a number of volunteer opportunities and particularly to find that COTA (Central Oregon Trail Alliance) is such a force for good here. They have been creating and maintaining trails for over 25 years and seem to be very well organized.

Yesterday, I joined a group of about 20 other trail workers to get our Level 1 Trail Steward Training. Everyone seemed to have experience and we made fast work of repairs on the COD trail. It made for a fun and rewarding day – I’ll definitely be back.

2018-04-07 11.41.19

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Ten Seconds of Kindness

2017-09-11 11.22.29Not only does the Mountain Trails Foundation in Park City do a great job building and maintaining trails in the area for hikers, bikers (both dirt and snow), skiers and dog walkers, they also do an excellent job educating users without a lecturing tone. This 10 Seconds of Kindness is a great model. I’ve always thought it is just as easy for bike riders to leave  a good impression as a bad one. If I’m on a great descent and things are feeling great I hate to stop but in the grand scheme of things stopping for another trail user just isn’t that big a deal. I stop, chat a bit and start again and I’m having fun again just like that. Thanks Mountain Trails for all that you do!

I Want it All!

view-from-top-of-corner-canyon


I attended a City Council meeting here in Draper the other night. The topic was an emotional one as the City was proposing ‘surplussing’ (selling off) a few hundred acres of the 2400 acres it owned in order to help pay off some of the bond that was used to buy the land. I think it’s great that the citizens want to save all the land as open space and I don’t want to see more ugly development in this area. A group called ‘Save the Hollows’ had formed to fight the surplussing effort and has done a good job galvanizing opinion and getting citizens to the meeting.

But the irony of what was said at the meeting was not lost on me – I can’t be the only one who noted the conflict. The quick summary of the public comments is basically: ‘I have my 2-acre lot with an amazing view, I don’t want to look at someone else’s house, and I want to preserve open space’. Or, ‘I came to Draper for the big lots and open space and don’t want to see it change’.

Doesn’t anyone connect the continued development of large lots with the loss of open space? Draper has grown from about 7,000 people in 1990 to about 47,000 today and the city projects a 5% growth rate for the next 5 years. If the 5% growth rate continues that means the population will double to over 90,000 in about 15 years. The question for the citizens here (just like in many other areas) should be ‘Are you willing to live in denser developments to preserve open space and save some of these wild lands?’ But, I don’t see anyone grappling with this bigger issue. New development in the low elevation areas of Draper is fairly dense but what will happen in these areas bordering the wild lands?

Do you have ideas about what to do? Will people change their home buying dreams? Will they live on a smaller lot in denser developments in order to preserve these wild lands?

Somewhere New to be Annoyed

hillbillies

I’ve lived in California for over 30 years except for a 2 year stint in the West of England and now I find myself moving to the Salt Lake City area. I’m curious what I’ll find there for commuting cyclists. There seem to be a few long distance bike paths and a fair amount of bike lanes especially in the newer developments so I get the feeling that the folks in Utah are investing in some bicycle infrastructure as they expand. As a mountain biker I’m pretty well covered. I’m stoked to see quite a few trails in Corner Canyon just east of Draper very close to where I’ll be working. And of course, Park City is renowned for some 400 miles of trails and just a few hours south are Moab, Fruita and other destinations for mountain bikers.

Along the Wasatch Front, there is an Amtrak service as well as light rail that seem to run fairly frequently so that will give me some options for getting around. Still, I don’t see any dedicated bike/ped crossings over Interstate 15 in the Draper area so getting across may be challenging as the interchanges crossing I-15 are wide and very high speed.

Have you lived in Utah? Any comments on how cycling will compare to the Bay Area are appreciated.

A Few More Definitions for Cyclists



Chain: Archaic method for connecting the cranks and rear wheel of a bike to provide forward motion. Dirty and greasy and the subject of continual efforts for at least 100 years to find a better alternative. Yet chains continue to combine the benefits of low cost, efficiency and relatively good reliability and have kept most ‘improvements’ at bay – at least until the ‘string drive’ came along

2015-04-18 11.07.13

salsa vest

Vest (gilet in the UK): Probably the most useful piece of clothing to own. Keeps your core warm without getting your arms too sweaty as when wearing a jacket. Can regulate your temperature with the simple movement of the zipper in temps from 45-65F.

High-vis: The popular bright lime green color worn by middle-aged cycling club members and others who want to survive on the road even if it means derision by the roadies wearing all black.

carbon

Carbon fiber: Woven high-strength material infused with resin that lightens your bike and wallet at the same time.

Kickstand: Controversial piece of hardware attached to the bike that keeps the bike from falling over when parked. Most won’t work on high-end bikes because the attachment method can crush carbon or thin-wall metal tubing. Enthusiast cyclists wouldn’t use one anyway since it is a feature similar to high-vis clothing and a dividing line between ‘racers’ and everyone else.

Fenders (mudguards in the UK): Useful piece of kit that covers the wheel reducing the amount of water spray that hits the rider. Another item that serious riders disdain unless it’s the minimalist version (such as SKS Raceblades) that can be used during training but never in a race where there is a shared joy in suffering.

Use full lane

Share the Lane sign: Cyclists think: ‘I can use the lane’. Motorists think: ‘Those bikes better get out of my way’. The more modern sign ‘Bike may use full lane’ is becoming more prevalent.

Velominati: Keepers of ‘The Rules’. 95 somewhat tongue-in-cheek rules on how to be a ‘legit’ cyclist. It gets superfluous after Rule #5 which is ‘Harden the F*** Up’. How can you talk about acceptable clothing colors, tire colors, tan lines and the like if you believe in HTFU?

Driver’s Ed: Class where motorists can learn such useful phrases as:
– ‘I didn’t see him’
– ‘She came out of nowhere’
– ‘Those bikes go too fast’
– ‘Those bikes go too slow’


Singletrack trail: Narrow trails that mountain bikers long for. Typically 4 feet wide in California and 1 foot in Idaho


Right turn hand signal: The old-school way of signaling a right turn is by using the left arm and pointing it up like you’re asking a question. Made sense in cars about 60 years ago before turn signals but makes no sense for bikes since cyclists can just indicate with their right arm. No idea why we still give cyclists this option since the only car drivers who understand this archaic signal are probably too old to be driving anyway.

Another Great Build Day at Demo

On Saturday February 28, I showed up at Demo for a build day. The weather forecast was a bit sketchy with the possibility of showers and even hail. I thought this might hold down the volunteer numbers but I was so wrong. I was told the count was almost 70. The whole group got a short orientation in the parking lot before heading down the fire road to the bottom.

Thankfully we had a few dogs along for entertainment. They enjoy the forest as much as we do and have the added benefit of not having to do any manual labor.

After a short hike to segment 4 we grabbed tools and got some safety instruction for our group from Mark Davidson – MBOSC el Presidente.

Then we spent the next 4-5 hours cutting and shaping. It’s always amazing that a bare sketch of a trail can get transformed so quickly into a fun berm ready to shred.

And the reward is a quick test ride before we headed back up the hill for some BBQ and refreshments.

Thanks to MBOSC and the BBQ crew for a great day of work. We at SVMTB sponsored the build day and appreciate the hard work of all the volunteers to make this trail come true.

We only had about 15 minutes of moderate rain while we were working but when we got back to the parking lot just after 3 it really turned on and kept up until we left just before 5. It was our first test of the SVMTB EZ-Up and we picked a perfect time for it.

MBOSC has several more build days coming up this year. If you ride Demo and want to see the Flow Trail completed, check out the calendar at Volunteer Trail Work Days and come out and lend a hand.

Phone Bank Get-Out-the-Vote Report

Drac

Calling to get the vote out for Measure Q once a week over the last month. Mostly I get reasonably friendly people who are interested to hear about this Open Space measure and, of course, some who aren’t. I get the occasional hang up but surprisingly, nobody rude. Often people answered the phone but said they were busy. I resisted the urge to say ‘You don’t HAVE to answer the phone’. I got one weird one on the final night. I give my spiel and the voter on the other end says ‘I haven’t had a chance to research any of the issues because Halloween is a big deal for me’. I was a little surprised that Dracula was on the voting rolls but I guess just about anything goes in the Bay Area.