Incubating

Interesting first visit to The Startup Building co-working space in Provo today to attend a Million Cups event. I met the building owner, Tom, and his family who seem to have made the space quite successful in the 4 years that they have owned it. Surprisingly, ‘Startup’ is the name of the family that started a chocolate company in the building 100+ years ago, and are still producing today.

I got a quick tour after the Million Cups event and was impressed by the number of entrepreneurs and students who have made this building in Provo their home.

One of the great things is the location. Right across the street from the Frontrunner train stop. Sure made getting to and from the event easy!

Meeting space:

Startup meeting room.jpg

Along the Wasatch Range you almost always have a view:

Startup building with view.jpg

More information on the co-working space is here Startup Building

Strangest Ski Lift

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I learned to ski just over 50 years ago. Back then, my Mom had to lace up my ski boots and help get me into my cable bindings. Skis were mostly still wood with metal edges screwed into them. It doesn’t seem so archaic to me but those technologies probably look as old to kids today as 9 foot skis with bear trap bindings looked to me back then. So, growing up, I was on some ski lifts that you almost never see anymore. Tow ropes – the glove manufacturers must miss those – the Poma lift – nothing like sticking a metal pole between your legs and being jerked up the hill to scare a young lad away from skiing – and the good old J-bar and T-bar which always claimed a few victims each time up the hill. Back then it was just as hard to learn to get up the hill as down.

Sometime in the last couple of decades the ‘Magic Carpet’ conveyor was introduced on the beginner hills and it’s easy to ride. You just slide on and ski off at the top. Not much more skill needed than being able to stand for a couple minutes. The strangest/coolest place I’ve seen one is the Peruvian tunnel under Hidden Peak at Snowbird. The tunnel connects Peruvian Gulch on the North side of Snowbird with Mineral Basin on the South side. I rode it for the first time today and it was worth the trip. Inside the tunnel, you’ll see a bit of history of mining in the region and some old machinery. You can check all this out on the 4 or 5-minute ride through the mountain – if you’re at Snowbird don’t miss it.

Tunnel entrance:

tunnel entrance.jpg

 

Some mining history:

tunnel mining artifacts.jpg

 

Peruvian tunnel stats:
Length: 600 ft (183m)
Depth underground: 200 ft (61m)
Time to ride: About 5 minutes

What about you? Have you ridden any unique lifts?

See a Kid Smile

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Helped out on this slightly rainy day at the ‘Bikes for Tykes’ put on by the Salt Lake City Bicycle Collective. It was sponsored by Bingham Cyclery and several other local bike concerns. There is nothing like seeing a kid’s smile as he/she is presented with a new (or slightly used bike) and the joy they have pedaling around the playground afterwards. Sure put me in the Christmas spirit.

If you want donate please check out this link Bingham Cyclery

I Want it All!

view-from-top-of-corner-canyon


I attended a City Council meeting here in Draper the other night. The topic was an emotional one as the City was proposing ‘surplussing’ (selling off) a few hundred acres of the 2400 acres it owned in order to help pay off some of the bond that was used to buy the land. I think it’s great that the citizens want to save all the land as open space and I don’t want to see more ugly development in this area. A group called ‘Save the Hollows’ had formed to fight the surplussing effort and has done a good job galvanizing opinion and getting citizens to the meeting.

But the irony of what was said at the meeting was not lost on me – I can’t be the only one who noted the conflict. The quick summary of the public comments is basically: ‘I have my 2-acre lot with an amazing view, I don’t want to look at someone else’s house, and I want to preserve open space’. Or, ‘I came to Draper for the big lots and open space and don’t want to see it change’.

Doesn’t anyone connect the continued development of large lots with the loss of open space? Draper has grown from about 7,000 people in 1990 to about 47,000 today and the city projects a 5% growth rate for the next 5 years. If the 5% growth rate continues that means the population will double to over 90,000 in about 15 years. The question for the citizens here (just like in many other areas) should be ‘Are you willing to live in denser developments to preserve open space and save some of these wild lands?’ But, I don’t see anyone grappling with this bigger issue. New development in the low elevation areas of Draper is fairly dense but what will happen in these areas bordering the wild lands?

Do you have ideas about what to do? Will people change their home buying dreams? Will they live on a smaller lot in denser developments in order to preserve these wild lands?

Turn off the music


There are 2 types of riders when it comes to the subject of listening to music while riding; those who do and those who don’t. Pretty basic. 

But in the category of music listeners there are a number of variants. Those who are reasonably responsible who use just one earbud so they can hear other trail users, those who don’t give a shit about other users and use 2 earbuds ensuring that they are a danger to other users, and the totally self-centered who play their music through a Bluetooth speaker that basically says ‘I don’t care about your outdoor experience, I’m going to impose my crappy music on you’. 

Both of these last 2 suck, but for different reasons. With the 2-earbud rider at least they only piss me off when they do something stupid like turn in front of me as I’m passing them because they couldn’t here me call ‘On your left’. Fortunately, this has only happened a few times and hasn’t been disastrous yet because I expect it to happen when the rider doesn’t acknowledge me. 

The Bluetooth rider is more clueless. He (and it has been a ‘he’ 100% of the time) thinks everyone wants to hear his music. Or maybe – ‘chicks dig it’. All I can promise is that for every 100 trail users he encounters, 100 won’t like his music. Either they don’t want to hear music (or phone calls, or motors, or any of the things they are escaping from) when they are on the trail. Or they just think, ‘your music sucks’. I can’t choose NOT to hear your music – you can choose to turn it off. 

So – just turn it off – don’t be a wanker. 

KS LEV Dropper Post Long-Term Review 

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I’ve ridden a number of dropper posts since about 2008. From the early days, I’ve sampled the Gravity Dropper, Crank Brothers Joplin, Fox DOSS and ended up buying the Kind Shock LEV in early 2014. For those of you who still haven’t bought a dropper post I’ll say that it’s one of the best upgrades you can make on your bike no matter what kind of bike you are riding – even a hardtail. If you like going fast downhill (or even if you don’t) it will give you more control and confidence. You’ll lower your center of gravity which gives more control in cornering and particularly on steep downhills the dropper will make you feel that you won’t go over the bars. If you’re riding flat to rolling non-technical terrain keep that fixed seatpost but if you are riding anything else and want to have more fun, get a dropper post!

One of my primary considerations whenever I buy bike parts is to get something reliable. Weight and other performance issues are important but always secondary to reliability. If I have to spend too much time fixing something it takes away from my ride time. If you have ever walked a few miles to get back to the trailhead due to a broken part, I guarantee that you won’t be thinking, ‘I’m so glad I saved 50 grams on that part – it failed but it sure is light!’. My experience with Crank Brothers several years ago was with a failed seatpost that wouldn’t return to the top. That pretty much ruined the rest of my ride trying to pedal uphill with a seat 5 inches below the correct climbing height. I knew a few MTB tour guides who were leading multi-day rides and carried a backup seatpost in their packs since they couldn’t fully trust the dropper posts they were running. That wasn’t for me.

So, in 2014 when I was shopping, the consensus was that the Rock Shox Reverb and the KS LEV were the most reliable posts. I tried them both in a shop and settled on the KS. It seemed particularly solid and the shop owner said he had fewer returns for repairs than with the RS post. The Fox DOSS was also out at that time but didn’t have as much of a track record so I wrote that one off.

Installation and Setup:

My bike (Yeti ASR 5C) didn’t allow for internal cable routing but the setup wasn’t really an issue. The external cable routing was clean and has never been a problem. Some early generation dropper posts had cables attached to the moving portion of the post (usually right at the seat mounting) which meant that the cable moved on the bike as you went up and down with the post. This was particularly annoying on the Crank Brothers Joplin as the cable housing would sometimes hit my leg or hang up on the frame somewhere. The LEV had a clean attachment to the top of the fixed portion of the post. The only weak point the shop warned me was the cover over the cable attachment that often fell off during use. The solution was to put a tie-wrap around the cover. Easy solution – but sort of disappointing to get a brand-new post and have to throw a band-aid on it right from the start. But hey – it works.

KS tie wrap.jpg

Tie-wrap band-aid

The post has an air cartridge to move the post. The Schrader valve is on the top of the post and requires you to remove the saddle to adjust the pressure. Sort of a hassle, but I’ve only set the pressure once and haven’t lost any air so I haven’t had to add air all this time.

The seatpost head uses the preferred 2-bolt attachment so adjusting the seat angle is easy and very secure. I’m not a big fan of button head screws as are used on the LEV since the hex size is usually a size smaller than a socket head cap screw. With the socket head cap screw you are less likely to strip out the hex if you are a ham-fisted mechanic. I understand the use of a button head since it is less likely to injure the rider in a crash than a socket head cap screw. So I’m just careful to fully engage the hex key and watch my torque.

KS 2-bolt.jpg

Out of the box there was a bit of side-to-side play (rotation) of the post but it was quite small and not noticeable when riding the bike. It’s more pronounced now than when I got the post but it is still just barely noticeable when riding and doesn’t bother me. I know some people who care a lot about these details so if you are one of those people you might not like it.

On the trail:

One of the key issues with any post is the remote lever design. The ergonomics and feel of the lever are critical. You want the lever to be located in a good position so that access is good – the most critical time to drop the post is just before a technical section and that is the last time you want your hand off the bar trying to activate a lever. The lever shouldn’t require too much force or throw (travel). It should also have enough ‘feel’ so you can detect the release point and know when the post will move. The KS lever meets all the critical criteria. I initially thought it might be a bit small but I’ve come to like it. If you’re running ODI lock-on grips the lever even integrates with the grip. Take off the inside collar and the clamp of the KS lever just slides onto the grip. Nice detail.

KS lever.jpg

Return speed:

Some dropper posts have an adjustment for the speed that the post goes to the up position. The return speed on the LEV is governed only by the initial air pressure setting and the speed has always seemed fine to me. Just fast enough and very consistent.

Reliability:

This post has been pretty much bullet proof. I rode it for 2 1/2 years before the first issue popped up. There was a noticeable clunking and a bit of stickiness when moving up to the top position. I assumed that I would have to send it back for service but I opted for the very simple sealhead service as described here http://blog.artscyclery.com/mountain/ask-a-mechanic-service-and-maintain-your-kind-shock-lev-dropper-post/ This was surprisingly easy and put the post back to like-new condition after just 30 minutes of effort.

Overall:

The LEV is a good post. Reliable and consistent performance and it hasn’t let me down. I’m starting to shop for a new bike and I definitely want a KS post on my next bike.