Enve RSR Handlebar Long-Term Review


Photo Courtesy of Annoyed Cyclist Photography School

It’s carbon. So it’s light and strong. I’ve been riding these bars for 2 years and they are like new. Realistically, I’ll never break them since they were probably designed for people who get more than 1 foot of air.

They are 740mm wide which is perfect. Unless you like narrower bars. Or wider bars. I just don’t want to bash trees. Because the trees always win.

It has sweep and rise (I’m sure the Enve website has some numbers) and magically my hands land right on the grips. I’m guessing your hands will find the bars, too.


The graphics – white on black

The graphics are understated. When I bought these bars that was cool. Now I’m not so sure – seems like Neon is big right now.





Me: Hey Jim- How was the weekend?
Jim: Great – I got engaged!
Me: What? To that woman you split up with a few months ago?
Jim: Yeah – that’s right.
Me: So what happened?
Jim: Well I found out the reason she was so crazy when we were living together was that she thought I wasn’t committed to the relationship.
Me: Uh, yeah, that makes ….. uh ….. sense.
Jim: That’s right. So when I proposed she realized I was committed.
Me: Wow – that’s great. How long were you guys dating?
Jim: 9 years
Me: Man – I can’t see why she didn’t think you were committed – dating someone for 9 years sounds like commitment to me.

Terrifying Two

6+ Lanes Crossing under the Interstate

I’ve had bike commutes from 6 to 20 miles before moving to Utah – some on narrow mountain roads around Santa Cruz and some on busy Silicon Valley streets both with and without bike lanes. I’ve ridden after dark on narrow 2 lane roads and some of my best memories are the ride back from Watsonville to Santa Cruz at 7 or 8 pm in the Winter with just a few cars on the road and a bit of a chill in the air. Larkin Valley on a crisp winter morning is particularly memorable. Even commuting this narrow road late at night wasn’t scary since the traffic was light and with my bright lights on I was probably more visible than in daylight. Plus I always assume drivers thought I was a bit deranged and gave me just a bit more room.

Larkin Valley serenity

Larkin Valley Morning

I’ve ridden busy Silicon Valley roads mostly with bike lanes but some without. Some drivers seemed unconcerned with my safety and drove too closely or pulled out in front of me but mostly I felt fairly safe. I think the reasonably large number of cyclists was a constant reminder to drivers that we were out there and although they might not have liked us they figured they had to accommodate us.

So I’m fairly comfortable around cars in a variety of conditions. But I still surprise myself with the level of trepidation I feel every time I do my 2 mile commute to work. I finally understand the fear that others feel when riding in an unwelcoming environment. I also realize the importance of numbers – just having more bike riders on the road makes us all more visible and I think drivers pay a bit more attention.


2016-06-22 08.32.46

6+ Lanes Crossing under the Interstate

The main road to work is a 6 lane feeder to Interstate 15. There is a bike lane but speeds on the road are 40-50 mph and I’m just one lone kook in the way. In California, I felt like drivers actually acknowledged me and acted with some sense of caution. In suburban SLC, I feel like I’ve gone back 20 years where car drivers have all the rights and cyclists just need to stay out of the way.

Just past the highway overpass shown above is an exit ramp from the Interstate. Those lucky drivers have their own lane coming onto my road but that is right where I have to move right to re-claim my bike lane. I’ll slow down in my lane before getting to the ramp then signal right – sometimes people give me a break and sometimes they don’t. Then the next issue is the disappearing bike lane below (ironically right after the ‘Right Lane, Bikes Only’ sign where my bike lane disappears into a right turn lane right where the right-hand car lane behind me disappears at the same time. I’m not really clear what the message on the sign means since the right turn lane is clearly meant for cars. So I have the occasional idiot using the disappearing lane to pass drivers in the middle lane all the while my bike lane is being consumed by a right turn lane. So I carefully take the lane while signalling and just hoping people look up from their phones long enough to see me. Once I make the right turn I do a quick u-turn so I can use the traffic light to cross my busy road. The thought of using the left turn lane in this direction of travel would be suicide. So then I get to sit at the light for a minute or 2 and count the red light runners – there are always a couple.

2016-06-22 08.35.00

The old disappearing bike lane trick

So that’s it. Literally not even a 2 mile commute but it’s a hairy one.

In defense of Utah government, I do have to say that one of the pleasant surprises moving here is the large number of bike lanes on arterial roads and the seeming willingness to include them on new construction. However, as regular riders everywhere know, we rarely have continuous bike lanes and mixing uses on very busy roads is off-putting to many. A separated bike lane would go a long way towards encouraging others to get on a bike to commute and run errands. As the roads are today, the barrier is pretty high for many people – thus the low participation rates in Utah compared to California.